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TACT Substudy Suggests Possible Strong Benefit for Chelation in Diabetics

One year ago the results of the TACT trial were published in JAMA, sparking an enormous controversy over the propriety of publishing a trial suggesting that chelation therapy might be beneficial in people with cardiovascular disease.

TACT Substudy Suggests Possible Strong Benefit for Chelation in Diabetics

TACT Substudy Suggests Possible Strong Benefit for Chelation in Diabetics

One year ago the results of the TACT trial were published in JAMA, sparking an enormous controversy over the propriety of publishing a trial suggesting that chelation therapy might be beneficial in people with cardiovascular disease. Chelation therapy has long been a staple of alternative medicine, but until the publication of TACT it had received no credit whatsoever in mainstream medicine. TACT was supported by the NIH as part of an initiaitve to test the scientific basis of alternative medical therapies.

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Men too can suffer from manopause

London: Feeling irritated, tired and having low sex drive? Well, if you're a male, then chances are that you could be hitting the ''Manopause'', say health researchers.

Yes, you heard it right. Just like women, men too could have ''male menopause''.

According to an earlier American study, as many as one in five males over the age of 65 could be experiencing symptoms of this condition, which include low libido, irritability, tiredness, weight gain, sweating, aches and pains.

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Hand pumps blamed for reduced libido

Medically, the male menopause is referred to as andropause - which implies the decline in the sex hormones (androgens) of men - namely testosterone.

In the case of women, menopause is triggered by the sudden fall in the sex hormones oestrogen and progesterone when the ovaries shut down, usually in late middle age.

Whereas, in case of men, fertility isn't affected, and there is no dramatic decline in testosterone but rather a natural, gradual reduction with age - about 0.5 per cent a year.

However, Dr Malcolm Carruthers, an authority on the andropause, believes some men become testosterone-resistant in their late 50s, meaning that despite normal levels of the hormone, the body is no longer able to respond to it in the same way.

Men make more gags than women

Testosterone plays a key role in health and wellbeing, as well as sexual function. It regulates energy, increases the production of red blood cells and protects against osteoporosis in adults, reports the Daily Mail.

According to Professor John McKinlay, of the New England Research Institute, there is ''no research to support the syndrome''.

He advises that those experiencing symptoms should increase physical activity and go on a diet rather than taking medication.

Dr. Carruthers explains: "The symptoms are caused by the body becoming resistant to the effects of testosterone. It's easily treated by giving more of the hormone, usually in the form of a gel or cream that can be rubbed into the shoulders or abdomen daily."